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Thank you Robin Williams! !

Thank you Robin Williams! !

Source: tracktoheaven
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tofumouth:

dude who knew peter griffin had it right in 2012

tofumouth:

dude who knew peter griffin had it right in 2012

Source: doublebrother
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cryptid-creations:

Daily Paint #631 - RIP Robin Williams :( by Cryptid-Creations

Since I didn’t make a tribute yesterday…

I’m not typically affected by the deaths of celebrities, but like a lot of people right now, the untimely passing of such a symbol of optimism has been very upsetting. :(

Thank you for sharing your talent with the world, Mr. Williams. We will miss you.

Source: cryptid-creations.deviantart.com
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In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general—arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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Source: stilleatingoranges
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fluxmachine:

movingthestill:

Title: BrugesArtist: Flux Machine

old one up at movingthestill.
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gnumblr:

GAME OF THRONES TONIGHT

Yea tonight!

Source: gnumblr
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wholockmagic:

Animated Doctor Who meets Tim Burton

Original Illustrations by Michael Kenny

(via adventuresofmoosehead)

Source: sammishi
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